Opportunity+: STEM Jobs in the Energy Industry

An exciting variety of challenging and fulfilling jobs make up the energy industry. These careers not only offer opportunities to make a difference in the world around you, but also they give you a chance to put your STEM skills to good use.

Opportunity+: STEM Jobs in the Energy Industry

An exciting variety of challenging and fulfilling jobs make up the energy industry. These careers not only offer opportunities to make a difference in the world around you, but also they give you a chance to put your STEM skills to good use.

Are you wondering what types of jobs are available, and which STEM skills you should focus on to help you join the energy field? Read over the jobs below for a preview of what each role entails, the important STEM skills they are built on, and the path you might take to get from where you are now to an amazing career in energy!

Plant Operator

Plant operators control the equipment that generates power in a plant. They manage and regulate the flow of power in and out. To be a plant operator, strong math and science skills are needed to understand and analyze the data required to safely and efficiently manage the plant. Plant operators must be strong problem solvers and able to collaborate with others who work to keep the plant running.
Typical minimum education required: Some college or vocational training

Plant Technician

Plant technicians install, test, and maintain key systems within a power plant. They are at the ready to solve problems, create efficiency, and help make connections between systems, since they are the ones who know their systems best. Technicians must have be able to plan installations and test equipment in logical sequences. They must also use math and science skills to track, manage, and interpret the data their system provides.
Typical minimum education required: Associate’s degree in an energy-related technical field

Operator Mechanic

Operator mechanics control the running of the physical systems that create the energy grid. They determine how to use equipment and make decisions related to the operating status of each part of their system. Operator mechanics help direct the actions of other technicians and operators to ensure the plant runs safely. Operator mechanics must have strong problem-solving and critical-thinking skills that will allow them to think quickly and clearly in high-pressure situations involving safety. They also must have strong engineering-based mechanical skills to understand and oversee the portions of the plant they are managing.
Typical minimum education required: High school diploma, with some energy-field related experience

Field Engineer

Field engineers monitor and manage the construction or improvement of the physical components of our energy grid. Strong observation and analysis skills are required to ensure that construction is safe and effective. Field engineers must also have the ability to collaborate and think critically to solve problems or offer solutions to problems as they appear.
Typical minimum education required: Bachelor’s degree

Lineworker

Lineworkers build and maintain power systems. They serve as the front line of support in creating and maintaining safe and working systems and are the first to respond when power is interrupted. Lineworkers must have strong math and science skills to understand the systems that they are charged with creating and maintaining. They must be able to problem-solve and quickly address any out-of-the-ordinary situations they might encounter.
Typical minimum education required: High school diploma, plus an apprenticeship or other formal technical training

Meter Technician

Meter technicians are responsible for calibrating and maintaining all of the parts of the energy grid that make measurements. These can include meters that measure the flow of electricity from place to place, as well as meters that measure temperature, moisture, and other vital plant systems. Meter technicians must have strong math skills to gather accurate data, along with a strong grasp of how electricity and other components of power generation work together.
Typical minimum education required: 2 years of technical school, and some experience with instrumentation

Electrician

Electricians create, manage, and maintain the flow of energy in the form of electricity. They must have strong science skills, particularly around how and why electricity flows from place to place, as well as the ability to problem-solve and think critically. Electricians use math and engineering skills to create new systems, make current systems more efficient, and ensure that conditions are safe for everyone who comes into contact with them.
Typical minimum education required: High school diploma, followed by some technical education and an apprenticeship

Energy Trader

Energy traders buy or sell shares of energy stocks to generate profits for companies or individuals. To be an energy trader, a strong grasp of how energy is generated, supplied, and used is vital, as are strong math and analytical skills.
Typical minimum education required: Bachelor’s degree, along with experience with the energy sector

Energy Analyst

Energy analysts take data generated by the creation, transmission, and use of energy and use it to understand trends and make predictions. Analysts must have strong math skills to help them break down large data sets, science skills that help them understand the type of energy they are analyzing, and technology skills so that they can use all of the tools needed to create and share detailed analyses.
Typical minimum education required: Bachelor’s degree in a field related to math or science

Energy Project Manager

In the energy field, a project manager oversees the management and implementation of projects to improve or create new systems related to energy generation, transmission, and use. Project managers use math and technology skills to analyze information from many directions and maintain organized and coherent plans.
Typical minimum education required: Bachelor’s degree in an energy-related field

ABOUT US

Get Into Energy / Get Into STEM is a ground-breaking program designed to build awareness among students, parents, teachers, guidance counselors, and others about the value of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education and the excellent career opportunities available in the energy industry.

Get Into Energy / Get Into STEM is managed by the Center for Energy Workforce Development (CEWD), a non-profit consortium of electric, natural gas, and nuclear utilities and their associations.

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