Teacher Resources

The goal of the Get into Energy / Get into STEM program is not only to help students see the exciting STEM career opportunities available in the energy industry. It also strives to provide educators with free but very valuable tools and information to help our future workforce Get into STEM.

Teacher Resources

The goal of the Get into Energy / Get into STEM program is not only to help students see the exciting STEM career opportunities available in the energy industry. It also strives to provide educators with free but very valuable tools and information to help our future workforce Get into STEM.

Get Involved in STEM

Visit the “Get Involved in STEM” student page

There are many different ways to get yourself and your students more involved in STEM. Consider joining a national or state-wide professional organization focused on STEM, or volunteer or become a leader with a local STEM-related organization or club. You might also consider starting a STEM club of your own!

 

Professional Organizations

 

Volunteer/Leadership Opportunities

 

Starting a New STEM Group

Want to start your own STEM group in your school or community? Here are some ideas for how to get started!

  • Define your goals and audience.
    What do you want your club to focus on? Do you want to use STEM to solve problems in the community? Do you want to focus on topics engineering-design principles or robotics? Who do you want your club to serve? How often do you plan to meet, and who can join? Having a sense of goals and audience will help you ensure that your club is focused and productive, right from the start.
  • Think about funding.
    No matter what your goals are, you’ll need at least a little bit of money to run your club. With your goals in hand, consider approaching your building or district administration for funding — sometimes there is money earmarked for STEM projects like yours. Reach out to your parent-teacher organization to see if they would be interested in sponsoring your club, or a specific project you club wants to complete. Community organizations and businesses may offer grants to STEM-based groups like yours or might be interested in donating money or materials. There are also a range of grant opportunities available to support STEM groups and projects – you can find a list of those here (link to grants/scholarships for teachers).
  • Consider starting a chapter of an established club.
    Groups like FIRST and Girls Who Code have materials and checklists at the ready for you to use to get started. They also may provide FAQs that you can use to your advantage, as well as tips learned as chapters in other locations have gotten off the ground. Established clubs also have networks of other chapter leaders that you can tap into for advice and ideas or to ask questions.
  • Find a collaborator.
    Having a partner to work with as you get your club up and running ensures that you have someone to share ideas, discuss concerns, and share the workload with.
  • Reach out to the community.
    STEM skills are rooted in real-world applications. Consider structuring your group so that the community is included. You might invite partners from local businesses to share challenges they’d like your help with, or visit businesses or groups in your community to see STEM at work. Connecting your members to the real-world impact of STEM can increase engagement and motivation, helping to ensure your group uses their time effectively.

 

ABOUT US

Get Into Energy / Get Into STEM is a ground-breaking program designed to build awareness among students, parents, teachers, guidance counselors, and others about the value of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education and the excellent career opportunities available in the energy industry.

Get Into Energy / Get Into STEM is managed by the Center for Energy Workforce Development (CEWD), a non-profit consortium of electric, natural gas, and nuclear utilities and their associations.

© 2018 Center for Energy Workforce Development. All Rights Reserved.